Eight tips for Laptop battery life maintenance

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1. When there is no external power, if the laptop can be working temporarily without a PCMCIA card slot, it is recommended to remove the card first to extend battery life time.

2. Room temperature (20-30 degrees) is the optimum working temperature of the battery. The too high or too low temperature operating environment will reduce battery usage time.

3. It is not correct to remove the battery for extended battery life when the environment can provide a stable power supply. Take Asus laptop for example, when the battery is fully charged, its charging circuit will automatically shut down, and so it will not overcharge.
4. It is suggested that an average of three months to conduct a battery power correction action is proper.

5. Minimize the number of battery usage.
The battery charge and discharge times are directly related to the life of it. The battery will forward to a retirement step for each charge. It is suggested that you try to use an external power supply as possible as you can.

6. Use an external power supply when the battery is removed.
Some users often plug the power of the laptop with the battery several times in a day, which does more damage to the battery. Because every access to an external power supply is the equivalent of charging the battery, the battery life shortened by a naturally.

7. Exhaust battery before the charge and Avoid charging time is too long
Regardless of your notebook uses lithium or NiMH, be sure to make the power exhausted after the full (capacity less than 1%), which is the best way to avoid the memory effect. Lithium also has memory effect, but its memory effect is smaller than nickel-metal hydride Bale.

8. The usual precautions
Prevent exposure, prevent damp and prevent the erosion of chemical liquids in daily use. Avoid battery touch with metal objects etc.

Whatever, if your battery worked out, you can definitely buy another high quality ones from  laptop battery providers.

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Review: MSI GT780 DX

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Review: MSI GT780 DX

Someone’s put some thought into the GT780 DX. For starters, this isn’t a badge engineering job using a commodity-spec whitebook as a starting point: MSI has commissioned a unique design.

The result isn’t going to have Apple rethinking its approach to laptop chassis quality but there is at least a frisson of flair in the multi-coloured (and user configurable) keyboard backlighting, slices of genuine brushed aluminium and bevelled chassis edges.

That keyboard is the result of an alliance with peripherals specialist SteelSeries and is probably the most tactile and satisfying we have used on any recent gaming laptop. Unlike the slightly rattle-prone and spongey boards offered by, for instance, Rock Xtreme 768 and Medion Erazer X6811, this one is solid of base and slick in action.

Speaking of partnerships, MSI has also teamed up with Dynaudio to sort out the sound. The idea is to project it carefully to the user, creating more depth and immersion. Put simply, it works. Although the sheer volume on offer is fairly modest, there’s a richness and expansiveness to the soundstage not many other laptops can match.

Another nice touch is the trackpad disable button. If you’re serious about serving up some online devastation, you’ll be using an external mouse. The last thing you want is accidental trackpad inputs. With the trackpad turned off, that’s not going to happen.

MSI trackpad

If the bits MSI is responsible for are best on test, what about the off-the-shelf components?

As TN LCD panels for laptops go, the 17.3-inch display is decent enough. Thanks to an LED backlight, whites are clean and bright. As TN screens go, the colours and viewing angles are far from shabby, too. Likewise, we’ve no beef with its responsiveness or the 1,920 x 1,080 native resolution.

The only problem is the existence of the Sony F Series and its drop-dead gorgeous screen. What’s been seen cannot be unseen and unfortunately the GT780DX’s LCD looks positively pedestrian by comparison.

Performance

Still, we’ve no such complaints about the gaming performance on offer. The quad-core Intel Core i7 2630QM and Nvidia GeForce GTX 570M are choice components.

Okay, we’d rather have a GTX 580M or AMD Radeon HD 6990M pumping the pixels. But with 336 shaders, 3GHz memory and a 192-bit bus, the GT780DX has genuine gaming chops. It certainly makes absolute mincemeat of Dirt 3, even at 1080p and with 4x anti-aliasing.

An average of 38 frames per second at the same settings in World in Conflict is very decent, too. Only the GPU-wilting Heaven benchmark really gets the better of it.

TechRadar Labs

tech labs

Rendering performance
Cinebench R10: Seconds: Quicker is better
MSI GT780 DX: 51s
Rock Xtreme 685: 46s

Battery life performance
Battery Life: Minutes: Higher is better
MSI GT780 DX: 141
Rock Xtreme 685: 108

DX11 gaming performance (1,280×720, 4x AA)
Dirt 3: Frames per second: Higher is better
MSI GT780 DX: 102
Rock Xtreme 685: 108

Industry standard 3D performance
3DMark 06: Index score: Higher is better
MSI GT780 DX: 16,634
Rock Xtreme 685: 20,497

DX10 gaming performance (1,280×720, 4x AA)
WiC: Frames per second: Higher is better
MSI GT780 DX: 57
Rock Xtreme 685: 74

Tessellation gaming performance (1,280 x 720, 4x AA)
Heaven: Frames per second: Higher is better
MSI GT780 DX: 28
Rock Xtreme 685: 40

As an overall package, this MSI has got to be the best balanced and most desirable notebook here. It’s not the fastest, it hasn’t got the best screen, but as a full package it’s very hard to fault.

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Review: Rock Xtreme 685

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Review: Rock Xtreme 685

See something familiar? That’s right, the Rock Xtreme 685 is yet another re-badged Clevo whitebook. On the downside, that means the styling is about as exciting as a Conservative Party Conference speech delivered by the Under-secretary of Dullness.

For a 15.6-inch notebook, the Xtreme 685 is a big old thing, too, with a hefty power supply. Put the two together and you have a dreary looking lump that’s also a pretty unpleasant package in terms of portability.

Appearances, however, are deceptive. This thing shifts. Partly, that’s because it’s got one of the most powerful processors currently available for a laptop. The Intel Core i7 2820QM is not only clocked a little higher than the quad-core competition with a 2.3GHz nominal clockspeed and 3.4GHz Turbo.

It also packs 8MB of cache memory where the Core i7 2630QM makes do with 6MB. All in, it makes the 2820QM about 15 per cent faster than the 2630QM.

In store Rock has also made an effort regards storage performance in the form of a pair of conventional magnetic 500GB hard drives in RAID 0. We’d rather have a smallish SSD and a large conventional drive, frankly. But as spinning magnetic platters in laptops go, Rock’s RAID’ed effort is about as good as it gets.

However, the real weapon in the Xtreme 685’s armoury is the AMD Radeon HD 6990M. It’s the fastest mobile GPU on the planet.

Just get a load of these stats: 1,120 shaders, 56 texture units, 32 ROPs and a 256-bit memory bus. No wonder the rendering and gaming performance is epic. The HD 6990M tears Dirt 3 a new one, even running in full HD.

But more impressive are the results in World of Conflict. It’s a great title for getting an idea of overall gaming performance thanks to heavily loading both the CPU and GPU. Get the balance of components in a laptop wrong and the result can be a system that spits out decent average frame rates in the WiC benchmark but scrapes the barrel in terms of the minimum frame rate.

But not the Xtreme 685. Running at 1,920 x 1,080 and with 4x anti-aliasing enabled, it cranks out an average 51fps and a minimum of 32fps. The latter, critically, is above 30 and that means smooth gaming at all times.

TechRadar Labs

tech labs

Rendering performance
Cinebench R10: Seconds: Quicker is better
MSI GT780 DX: 51s
Rock Xtreme 685: 46s

Battery life performance
Battery Life: Minutes: Higher is better
MSI GT780 DX: 141
Rock Xtreme 685: 108

DX11 gaming performance (1,280×720, 4x AA)
Dirt 3: Frames per second: Higher is better
MSI GT780 DX: 102
Rock Xtreme 685: 108

Industry standard 3D performance
3DMark 06: Index score: Higher is better
MSI GT780 DX: 16,634
Rock Xtreme 685: 20,497

DX10 gaming performance (1,280×720, 4x AA)
WiC: Frames per second: Higher is better
MSI GT780 DX: 57
Rock Xtreme 685: 74

Tessellation gaming performance (1,280 x 720, 4x AA)
Heaven: Frames per second: Higher is better
MSI GT780 DX: 28
Rock Xtreme 685: 40

rock xtreme 685

Of course, all of the above applies to current titles. Scope out the frame rates in the Heaven benchmark and it’s clear any future games heavy in tessellation effects aren’t exactly going to fly. And like nearly every laptop, upgrading the graphics card is a non-starter.

Finally, a word on the LCD panel. Thanks to the 15.6-inch diagonal and full-HD 1,920 x 1,080 native resolution, the image quality is super sharp. However, the panel is of the TN variety and it’s never going to match a VA or IPS for colours, viewing angles or contrast.

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