Corsair Vengeance M60 gaming mouse

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 Corsair Vengeance M60 gaming mouse

Overview

This Corsair Vengeance M60 mouse represents the next step for Corsair – peripherals.

Specifically, high-end peripherals designed for the gamer who’s prepared to pay a little more for a rugged build and enhanced usability.

The Vengeance M60 FPS gaming mouse is a prime example of that – premium components, eight-button functionality, and all the extras like adjustable DPI buttons and a mega-low DPI ‘sniper’ button that’s rapidly becoming the standard for a gaming rodent.

Corsair has a pretty impressive pedigree across a number of fields. The Californian company started out producing L2 cache modules, and today it’s still go-to guy for performance RAM like the Vengeance and Dominator DDR3 ranges.

In recent times we’ve seen speaker systems, power supplies, PC chassis and USB flash drives all bearing the Corsair name, and by and large it signals a mark of the highest quality.

The specs for this new mouse are impressive, but can Corsair really pull off a flawless debut into the mouse market with the Corsair Vengeance M60?

Perhaps unsurprisingly, the answer’s yes.

Verdict

There are two mice in Corsair’s fledgling range – the M90 caters for the MMO gamer’s needs, and as such sports fifteen programmable buttons.

This M60 sets its sights square and true on the first-person shooter afficionado, for whom split seconds and DPI figures are everything.

With that said, even the grouchiest CS:S gamer will be happy with the Corsair Vengeance M60’s performance.

Corsair vengeance m60

The jury’s still out on whether DPI really makes a huge difference, but the M60’s adjustable polling rate, high tracking speed and low-friction PTFE pads make for a noticeably smooth experience.

And if you’re still hung up on that DPI comment, it’s 100 dots higher than our previous darling of the rodent world, Mad Catz’s Cyborg R.A.T. 7.

This is a mouse that lots of clever people have sat and thought about for a long time – that much is evident in its ergonomic design.

The sniper button feels well-placed enough that you’d actually use it, and the thumb rest blends perfectly into your mouse mat.

Having experimented with the M60 it turns out to be comfortable in all but the most improbable hand position, which is worth thinking about if you’re such a pro gamer that you’ve analysed your own grip.

Show off.

You don’t have to be Fatal1ty to expect more adjustable weighting though, and that’s sadly off the menu with this mouse. All you get are three removable weights in the base, so you can make it lighter but not heavier is that is your bag.

Take an eyeful of the price tag and you’ll understand why the Corsair Vengeance M60 doesn’t offer this – it’s clear that most of the money has been spent on its remarkable build quality – but it does lose ground to the similarly-priced R.A.T. 5 from Mad Catz here, which is far more adjustable by weight.

We liked

For a debut effort, the Corsair Vengeance M60 mouse is incredible.

It’s hard to pick a fault with it if you’re a FPS gamer. Primarily, you want a comfortable mouse that doesn’t have a ton of buttons you’ll keep accidentally pressing at a fair price, and Corsair’s rodent ticks all those boxes with confidence.

The adjustable DPI and sniper button are useful additions in a layout that otherwise shows restraint, and it feels like it could survive a nuclear blast.

We disliked

It is missing out on more fully-adjustable weights and a free-rolling wheel, but the low price eases those concerns considerably.

Final word

Corsair’s debut mouse hits the ground running – right to the front of the pack.

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Intel Core i7 3930K

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 Intel Core i7 3930K

Overview

The Intel Core i7 3930K is the cheaper alternative to the top-end Sandy Bridge E processor. But then many second hand cars are cheaper than the top-end Sandy Bridge E processor.

At nearly £500 it’s still an expensive CPU, but currently it’s the only LGA 2011 processor worth a look.

The Intel Core i7 3960X, that top-end Sandy Bridge E, is a positively preposterous processor. For in excess of £800, you get a chip that’s not substantially quicker than Intel’s own Core i7 980X of two years ago.

Not at stock clocks, at least. Admittedly, the Core i7 3960X does overclock very nicely indeed and in doing so opens up a gap from ye olde 980X.

But we’ve reviewed the 3960X elsewhere and deemed it disappointing, moderately sinister (it’s prima facie evidence of Intel carpet bagging in response to AMD’s failure to bring out a really quick chip) and largely irrelevant to human existence.

This then is the Intel Core i7 3930K and it’s not the same chip. Not precisely, anyway.

Benchmarks

You can see below just how small a gap, in performance terms, there is between the i7 3960X and the i7 3930K.

It’s also interesting just how close the latest traditional Sandy Bridge chip, the Intel Core i7 2700K, is in general performance terms too, especially in gaming and single-threaded speeds.

3D rendering performance

Intel core i7 3930k

Intel core i7 3930k

Video encoding performance

Intel core i7 3930k

CPU gaming performance

Intel core i7 3930k

Verdict

Yes, this Core i7 3930K is based on the same, quite colossal 2.27 billion transistor chip, known as Sandy Bridge E. So, it shares most of the same specifications as the Core i7 3960X. That starts with six cores in Intel’s latest Sandy Bridge-generation idiom.

Next up we have a new memory controller no fewer than four (yes four, count ’em) channels.

Intel core i7 3930k

Intel’s previous high end processors sported a triple channel memory controller. Even that looked like overkill for a desktop processor. Four channels is getting silly and merely serves to underline the real reason the new Core i7 exists.

It’s a thinly disguised server chip.

Whatever the merits of the quad channel controller, it forces the use of a new socket, the monumental LGA 2011. If nothing else, you are getting a satisfyingly massive chip for your money.

What’s more, thanks to the ‘K’ on the end of Intel Core i7 3930K, this lower priced alternative to the Intel Core i7 3960X gets the full unlocked treatment and also benefits from the newly introduced CPU strap, the better to make overclocking a bit more flexible.

At this stage, you may be wondering what on earth the difference actually is.

The answer is twofold. Firstly it’s clocked infinitesimally lower – 3.2GHz instead of 3.6GHz, along with a commensurate climb down in the maximum Turbo speed to 3.8GHz. The other bit is less L3 cache memory to the tune of 3MB. The 3930K makes do with 12MB.

Frankly, both of these compromises in the name of cost savings fall into the ‘who cares?’ category.

In terms of desktop computing, neither is going to make a blind bit of difference to experience your PC delivers. That’s reflected in benchmarks that are barely any slower. Even better, the 3930K overclocks very nearly as well as the 3960X. Again the gap is just 100MHz, 4.8GHz on airs plays 4.9GHz.

So, here’s the best bit. The 3930K costs over £300 less.

OK, £500 is still a big ask. But the difference in price alone is enough to buy a half decent desktop PC or a cheap laptop.

The point, then, is that this cheaper Sandy Bridge E gives you everything the top chip delivers for a lot less money.

There’s absolutely no reason to spend. We’re not completely convinced even this truly means the Intel Core i7 3930K is good value for money, but it’s still a very fast processor and the chip we’d buy if we had a big budget.

We liked:

The fact that you’re getting almost the same sort of performance out of this £500 Sandy Bridge E as the £850 Core i7 3960X makes it a more intriguing prospect.

The other boon of the Core i7 3930K is that it’s got the same huge amount of overclocking headroom sitting in that CPU package. You can reach extraordinary speeds out of this architecture.

We disliked:

As it’s still based on the same architecture as the Core i7 3960X it’s also got the same flaws, namely that it’s actually an eight-core CPU with a couple of cores turned off.

And despite the fact it’s over £300 cheaper than the top end chip, the Core i7 3930K is still an incredibly pricey processor.

Final word:

Much better value than the 3960X. The obvious choice if you’re thinking of the LGA 2011 platform.

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GDesk, iPhone theme for Symbian 5th Edition

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GDesk, iPhone theme for Symbian 5th Edition

Increase the collection of GDesk Themes: Today we announce a theme based on the interface of the iPhone. We can say that the theme is very basic, as happens on the phone to Apple (at least up to firmware 3), but very fast in its use.

Crazy Goblins: World War II, arriving in a beautiful third-person Shooter Game

TouchArcade shows the first images of what will be a new third-person shooter game., Diasponibile soon in the App Store. The game is called Crazy Goblins: World War II. The developers who are creating have indicated that the work is still being improved and that soon it will offer its first video-game.

Even in terms of graphics the game looks well built, although the certainty is given by the video that will follow in the coming days. The game should still be available for next month.

We will keep you informed on this new titoloo, showing the possible future Screenshots and videos will be released. For now, no information on the weapons, missions and purpose of the game. We look forward to.

Poll: Improve Android updates? And if they were paid?

It is useless to deny it, revealing a certain discontent common regardless of whether it is Samsung, HTC, Acer, Sony Ericsson and other manufacturers, with respect to the Android software updates.

On the one hand there are the manufacturers: to develop a product, create the hardware, optimized the Android software, and especially change the interface specific UI is definitely a job for a week. The times are much longer than one interface is more complex and diverse. Continuously updates released by Google certainly does not help to keep up and also all the manufacturers need to think about different phones and not to a single device at the same time.

There are other users: who spends 400/500 € for a phone you expect, with good reason, to receive a long-lasting support, a series of updates that improve the software features and a clear transparent and sincere on the part communications company. In addition, the customer expects to receive updates for distribution terminals that are not too old and can accommodate a “major update” with the hardware Inventory report. The customer expects spending 400/500 € a life cycle of the phone at least 18/24 months.

This unfortunately seems to happen and the reasons are many and as always linked to the economic factor.

But how could we find a meeting point between the interests of the houses and those of users?

Copy the way Apple could be a very clever solution by releasing the “major update” for a fee. This would mean that, if a phone comes out with Android 2.1, and is updated while keeping the same version, the update will be released without charge. If, however, after months, is updated to a higher version, say Android 2.2, this can be paid aggironameto (5 / 10 € for example).

In practice, if we take a Hero released in late September with Cupcake 1.5, this nine months after receiving the update 2.1. This update may be issued to pay, perhaps to 9 €. With this system, the houses could recover the money “spent on” development and might be encouraged to release the first update.

By applying this methodology in a larger scale, an update released Android 2.2 to a Hero maybe in November or December at an extra charge, increase the life of the phone and do not abandon to its fate after a few months.

An optical simplistic and does not take into account other factors, and perhaps more specific regulation, but, assuming remaining generalist.

Steve Jobs WWDC 2010 focused on the iPhone OS

In a little less than a month will see Apple’s most anticipated event: the presentation of new-generation iPhone. Together, the iPhone will be released the final version of the new firmware 4.0. During the WWDC, Apple will be rewarded by the best applications for iPhone and Mac, but this year’s Design Awards, or the award of the Application, will be exclusively dedicated to the iPhone OS, leaving the Mac

Many developers who create their own app for the Mac have felt saddened by this decision, to the point that Gansrigler Matthias, Flickery maker, has decided to send an email to Steve Jobs to know the reasons for this choice.

In the email, Matthias wonders why Apple has put aside the Design Awards for Mac developers and if there are hopes for the future.

Steve’s answer, strangely than usual argued:

We are focusing primarily (but not exclusively) on iPhone OS this year. Maybe next year we will focus mainly on Mac Just as is the normal cycle of things. No hidden meaning in everything.

Coming straight to the point, Steve admits that this year the work dedicated to the iPhone OS are really the most important. With the launch of the iPad and the imminent launch of the new iPhone, even within the resources of Cupertino are working on mainly two mobile devices.

So expect great things from this new OS for the time being only the third beta.

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